Amref Health Africa UK

ANNUAL REVIEW 2017

Securing the Right to Health

“I gained so much from the eLearning programme. With five children and a very demanding job, I never thought that I would get a chance to go back to school.

I can now handle and manage obstetric and paediatric emergencies and other pregnancy-related complications. Now I have hopes of acquiring a degree in the future.”

Marion Tumuhimbise, midwife at Rubaga Hospital in Kampala, Central Uganda

Thank you for your support

We are grateful for gifts, donations and support of all sizes, which have contributed towards our work in sub-Saharan Africa.

  • President

    The Duke of Richmond & Gordon

    Board

    Mark Chambers (Chair)

    Amanda Caine (Treasurer)

    Paul Davey (Resigned on 28th

    February 2017)

    Sue Hunt

    Sally James (Resigned on 28th February 2017)

    Craig Pollard

    Alistair Smith

    Corporate Partners

    Accenture Development

    Partnership

    Allen & Overy

    Euromoney Institutional

    Investor PLC

    GSK

    Institutions

    Big Lottery Fund

    Comic Relief

    Department for International

    Development

    European Commission

    The Government of the Faroe Islands

    Jersey Overseas Aid Commission

    Trusts and Foundations

    Miss K. M. Harbison's Charitable Trust

    PF Charitable Trust

    Somerset Local Medical Benevolent Fund

    A&E Education Trust

    The Allan & Nesta Ferguson Charitable Trust

    The Beatrice Laing Trust

    The Bryan Guinness Charitable Trust

    The Charles Hayward Foundation

    The Dulverton Trust

    The Evan Cornish Foundation

    The Fulmer Charitable Trust

    The Gilander Foundation

    The Golden Bottle Trust

    The Headley Trust

    The Hermitage Trust

    The Lord Deedes of Aldington Charitable Trust

    The Michael and Anna Wix Charitable Trust

    The Paget Charitable Trust

    The Peter Stebbings Memorial Charity

    Peter Storrs Trust

    The Prince of Wales’s Charitable Foundation

    Souter Charitable Trust

    The St Mary's Charity

    Veta Bailey Charitable Trust

    Stella Symons Charitable Trust

    Schroder Charity Trust

    The Chalk Cliff Trust

    Community Partners & Supporters

    The City of London School

    People for People

    Lady Sally Poltimore - Hungerford Christmas Fair

    Wolfson College, University of Oxford - Amref Supporter Group

    remove

WELCOME TO OUR 2017 ANNUAL REVIEW

Last year, Amref UK supported 16 programmes in 15 countries, reaching 333,972 people.

In 2016, the international community committed itself to achieving Universal Health Coverage (UHC) by 2030*. This is an ambitious goal, but it’s one that Amref Health Africa firmly believes can and must be achieved. Health is a human right - and it’s the key to a brighter future. Good health opens up the possibility of freedom from poverty. It’s directly linked to access to education, economic empowerment, political participation, and the fulfilment of the whole spectrum of human rights.

Our belief in health as a basic human right drives everything we do. As an African-led organisation, headquartered in Nairobi for more than sixty years, our knowledge of the communities we work with, and the health challenges they face, is unparalleled - making us uniquely placed to secure lasting change. That’s why Amref Health Africa will keep working to ensure everyone’s Right to Health is realised across sub-Saharan Africa. We will continue to put women and girls at the heart of these efforts: because if access to good-quality, affordable healthcare is to be universal, it must also be equitable.

I hope that this review gives you a good idea of the breadth of Amref’s work - but also its depth. We are convinced that strengthening health systems from the ground up is the surest way to secure lasting change. To this end, we work at all levels, in close partnership with communities, local authorities and national governments, to find sustainable solutions to even the most complex of challenges.

In 2017, Amref UK made the strategic decision to invest in our team and our infrastructure, ensuring that we’re equipped to grow and diversify our income. This puts us in the best possible position to extend the reach and impact of our work in Africa in the months and years to come.

In the following pages, you’ll see just a few examples of this work, and hear from some of the remarkable frontline health workers advocating for change. We firmly believe that sharing these stories, and raising awareness of the challenges and successes experienced by those on the ground, is part of our mission here in the UK.

I’d like to thank everyone who has been, and continues to be, part of this mission. I hope the following pages inspire you to keep supporting us as we work together to secure the right to health in sub-Saharan Africa.

Frances Longley

Chief Executive, Amref Health Africa UK
*UHC falls under Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3 on Health and Wellbeing.

HOW WE WORK

Amref Health Africa has always used innovative methods to reach the most remote and marginalised communities and groups. We started life in 1957 as the Flying Doctors of East Africa.

1957

Today, we use eLearning and mobile technology to strengthen health systems and to bridge the gap between services and the people who need them – ensuring that no-one is left behind.

Women and girls are at the heart of everything we do. Every day, women around the world make decisions that directly affect the health and wellbeing of their households. They give birth, and in most cases, they’re the primary caregivers to babies and children. Women decide what their families will eat. They make choices about water, sanitation, and hygiene in the household. They are the gatekeepers of their communities’ health.

Yet in many parts of the world, women face a range of barriers that stand in the way of their own good health. In too many cases, women are denied access to the information and services they need to be able to make choices about their health. They may face discrimination, endure assaults on their freedoms, or be subject to gender-based violence. Their voices may be silenced and their opportunities limited.

Good health is key to women’s economic, social and political empowerment. That’s why we work with women and girls to overcome these barriers, harnessing women’s power to transform their own lives and the health and lives of their families and communities.

Through our work, we address four
crucial and complementary themes:

Maternal, New-born and
Child Health (MNCH)

Health Worker Training

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

Sexual and Reproductive
Health and Rights (SRHR)

Where we work

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to 11% of the world’s population, and bears almost a quarter of the global disease burden – yet only 3% of the world’s health workers live there. We are working to redress this imbalance by training frontline health workers fighting every day for the right to health.

Sixty years after our founding, Amref is proud to remain a truly African organisation. We work at all levels, from the grassroots to the governmental, to effect lasting change. Our strong connections, unique mandate and good reputation mean that we can go where other organisations cannot or do not, reaching some of the continent’s most remote and marginalised communities and groups.

Amref Health Africa UK is one of 11 offices in Europe and North America that raise funds and broker partnerships to support and further our work in Africa.

  • Tanzania

    Health Worker Training:

    GSK Frontline Health Worker Programme

    MNCH:

    Mobile Vaccination (mVacciNation) in Geita and Shinyanga Regions

    SRHR:

    Improving access to Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights services in Handeni and Meatu Districts


    81,816 people reached

  • Uganda

    Health Worker Training:

    GSK Frontline Health Worker Programme

    MNCH:

    Improving Maternal, New-born and Child Health in two districts in Central Uganda: Nakaseke and Kyankwanzi


    21,647 people reached

  • Ethiopia

    Health Worker Training:

    GSK Frontline Health Worker Programme

    WASH:

    Improving access to water and sanitation in the slums of Addis Ababa

    WASH:

    Combatting trachoma in South Omo

    25,603 people reached

  • Kenya

    Health Worker Training:

    Prevention, management and control of diabetes and childhood asthma in four of the most-affected counties: Nairobi, Nyeri, Kakamega and Kilifi

    MNCH:

    Improving Maternal, New-born, Child and Youth Health in Kibera and Dagoretti

    18,061 people reached

TANZANIA

UGANDA

ETHIOPIA

KENYA

Tanzania

Health Worker Training:

GSK Frontline Health Worker Programme

MNCH:

Mobile Vaccination (mVacciNation) in Geita and Shinyanga Regions

SRHR:

Improving access to Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights services in Handeni and Meatu Districts

81,816 people reached

Uganda

Health Worker Training:

GSK Frontline Health Worker Programme

MNCH:

Improving Maternal, New-born and Child Health in two districts in Central Uganda: Nakaseke and Kyankwanzi

21,647 people reached

South Sudan: 1 Project

Fistula surgical outreach

Ethiopia

Health Worker Training:

GSK Frontline Health Worker Programme

WASH:

Improving access to water and sanitation in the slums of Addis Ababa

WASH:

Combatting trachoma in South Omo

25,603 people reached

Kenya

Health Worker Training:

Prevention, management and control of diabetes and childhood asthma in four of the most-affected counties: Nairobi, Nyeri, Kakamega and Kilifi

MNCH:

Improving Maternal, New-born, Child and Youth Health in Kibera and Dagoretti

18,061 people reached

South Africa: 1 project

Non-communicable Diseases

Countries where we partner with GSK to train health workers: Angola, Burundi, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, South Africa, South Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia.

Countries of strategic focus for Amref UK
Countries where we partner with GSK to train health workers

Headline Achievements

In 2017, Amref Health Africa UK funded

16 programmes
across 15 countries

WE DIRECTLY SUPPORTED

333,972people

and trained

8,669

health workers

who went on to use these skills to support their communities.

Through outreach programmes, health education and psychosocial support, we reached almost

8.6
million people

across the African continent – demonstrating the reach and lasting impact of our work

Since 2015, we have worked in partnership with international law firm Allen & Overy to improve sexual and reproductive health services in two rural districts of Tanzania, Handeni and Meatu. To date, the project has reached 257,923 young people and women of reproductive age, enabling them to make informed choices about their sexual and reproductive health. Through our team’s advocacy efforts, the Meatu District government committed to increasing the budget allocated to sexual and reproductive health eighteen-fold: just one example of how Amref works at all levels to facilitate lasting change.

Our work to improve maternal health in Kenya was showcased on the BBC’s The One Show as part of Sport Relief in March 2018, when presenter Alex Jones visited our clinic in Kibera, the African continent’s largest urban slum.

We were nominated for a Bond Award in recognition of our partnership with Accenture, the Vodafone Group, and the Kenyan Ministry of Health to develop Leap, a mobile learning platform that functions on smart and standard phones. To date, 38,000 Community Health Workers have been trained through Leap.

Spotlight

Anti-FGM activist Nice Nailantei Leng’ete

Nice Nailantei Leng’ete is a Project Officer with Amref Health Africa in Kenya, where she works with Maasai communities to end the practice of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM, also known as Female Genital Cutting or FGC). In early 2018, Nice’s work was recognised by TIME Magazine, which listed her as one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

FGM/C is not only physically and psychologically harmful; it’s often directly linked to child marriage and a lack of education for girls. Although the practice was made illegal in Kenya in 2011, the law is not always enforced, leaving thousands of girls subjected to ‘the cut’ every year.

Nice was just eight years old when she ran away from her home in the village of Noomayianat to avoid having to undergo FGM/C. When she was caught, Nice endured beatings and faced social stigma – but she persisted, and eventually convinced her grandfather, a Maasai elder, to allow her to escape ‘the cut’ and continue her schooling.

Today, 27-year-old Nice works with communities like hers to eliminate FGM/C and replace it with ‘Alternative Rites of Passage’ (ARP) ceremonies that allow communities to celebrate girls’ transition to womanhood without causing them harm.

“I have seen too many women and girls, too many friends, have their dreams taken away from them.

Harmful practices have impacted their lives, and they can never get those days back. I’ll continue to fight until no Maasai girl has to undergo FGM/C. Every young girl in Kenya can become the woman of her dreams. I am, for sure.”

Nice Nailantei Leng’ete

Since 2009, more than 16,000 girls in Kenya and Tanzania have transitioned to womanhood via ‘Alternative Rites of Passage’ ceremonies, allowing them to finish their education, marry when they feel ready to, and achieve their ambitions. Nice’s story illustrates what can happen when a young woman claims her human rights and takes control of her future. She is one of thousands of courageous young women fighting for their own rights, and those of their friends and peers - and paving the way for the next generation.

“FGM and child marriage will end in Africa because of the likes of Nice.”

Jaha Dukureh, CEO and founder of Safe Hands for Girls, and Nobel Peace Prize nominee.

Case Studies

MATERNAL, NEW-BORN AND CHILD HEALTH (MNCH)

  • UGANDA:

    helping women give birth safely and with dignity

    add

    #RightToHealth: The biggest risk to the lives of teenage girls and women in sub-Saharan Africa today is pregnancy and childbirth. Amref is working to change this.

    Since 2015, we have partnered with Comic Relief to increase the quality of essential MNCH services – and encourage uptake of those services – in two districts of Central Uganda, Nakaseke and Kyankwanzi. We are refurbishing health facilities, building the skills and confidence of nurses and midwives, and delivering a comprehensive programme of community outreach aiming to tackle some of the misconceptions surrounding health facilities which can prevent women from making use of the support that’s available.

    Mani Isaac is a Senior Clinical Officer and in-charge at Sirimula Health Centre in Kyankwanzi District, a level-two facility (and the only health centre in the sub-county) serving more than 20,000 people. “I’ve worked here since 2013,” he says. “In the maternity ward, we used to have to improvise on almost everything: we didn’t have a delivery bed, and we were using a kerosene lamp at night. We often had to ask pregnant women to pay for their own kerosene. Any complicated cases had to be referred to the nearest level-four facility, which is 15 kilometres away. This discouraged women from coming to the centre; instead, they were giving birth at home, with traditional birth attendants. These conditions are no more: the maternity ward is now equipped with delivery beds and solar panels, and the number of women delivering here has grown steadily. This reflects the community’s increased confidence in the facility.”

    Sirimula is one of eight facilities supported by Amref and Comic Relief. The project has seen a 13% increase in the number of pregnant women attending at least four antenatal care visits during their pregnancy, and a 20% increase in the percentage of deliveries attended by skilled personnel: meaning that women in Nakaseke and Kyankwanzi can give birth safely, and with dignity.


    PARTNER: Comic Relief

    Our Results

    • 6,004 women of reproductive age supported
    • 1,054 women of reproductive age vaccinated against HPV, lowering their risk of cervical cancer
    • 49,936 children under 5 years received vitamin A supplements and deworming tablets
    • 2,489 people reached with health promotion information
    • 86 MNCH champions engaged in refresher training to improve their knowledge and confidence
    • 60 community dialogue meetings held
    • 60,000 listeners reached through four radio talk shows
  • KENYA:

    supporting women living with HIV

    add

    #RightToHealth: Although HIV infection rates have declined in recent years, Kenya remains one of the highest-burden countries in the world: 1.6 million people are still living with HIV. There is still considerable stigma surrounding HIV, which can discourage people who test positive from seeking treatment and support.

    As part of our MNCH work in Nairobi, Amref and Comic Relief are working together to train and support HIV-positive women who, having followed treatment, are healthy and have given birth to HIV-negative babies. These ‘Mentor Mothers’ draw on their own experiences to support pregnant women who have just learned their status, supporting them through pregnancy, birth and beyond. Phoebe Adhiambo Orondo (pictured) is one of them. Born and raised in Kibera, she was just 17 when she learned of her status. Now 34 and married with a little girl, she’s a role model in her community.

    “When expectant mothers first learn their status, they often assume that because they’re HIV-positive, their baby will be, too. They’re in a very vulnerable state,” she says. “One of the things that helps me in my line of work is being able to tell them that I’ve been through the same thing.

    “What we’ve been able to do has created substantial change in the community. And it’s not easy: there is still a lot of stigma. But we’re doing our best to make sure that everybody is able to get the right information and make good decisions about HIV. Our goal is to get to zero transmission of the virus from mothers to babies. That’s what keeps me going. And I believe it’s doable. No-one should die of HIV while I’m around.”


    PARTNER: Comic Relief

    Our Results

    • 4,496 women of reproductive age made use of MNCH services and were visited at home by Community Health Workers (CHWs)
    • 1,105 people living with HIV trained to support their peers
    • 9,857 people living with HIV supported through psychosocial support groups
    • 333 female CHWs supported
    • 241 nurses and midwives trained
    • 32 Mentor Mothers and Male Mentors supported
  • TANZANIA:

    ensuring children receive life-saving vaccinations

    add

    #RightToHealth: Vaccines are one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions in existence. However, the WHO estimates that one in ten children worldwide don’t receive any vaccinations, leaving them at risk of potentially deadly diseases like measles, mumps, tetanus and typhoid.

    mVacciNation is an innovative smartphone application that aims to reduce the number of missed vaccination appointments, ensuring that children in Geita and Shinyanga Regions complete their immunisation schedules. It allows frontline health workers to record data for every child they vaccinate, monitor vaccine temperatures, and keep track of stock levels. This data synchronises with the cloud, triggering mVacciNation’s unique feature: it sends SMS reminders to parents or caregivers three days in advance of their next vaccination appointment, giving them time to plan for the visit. It also alerts District Immunisation Officers when technical intervention is needed.

    The SMS feature has led to an increase in the uptake of vaccination services by parents and caregivers. One woman in Shinyanga Region said: “My husband used not to allow me to go to the health facility for healthcare services. However, when we started to receive the reminder messages, he became more supportive. Now he accompanies me and our child to the health centre for each appointment”.

    By improving the way data is captured and managed, mVacciNation aims to overcome barriers to immunisation in parts of the country where health systems are weak. It even works offline, and on any mobile network. Amref has always used ‘the tools of our time’ to reach the most remote communities. mVacciNation is a good example of how we harness the power of technology to ensure that no-one is left behind.

    “Even if the electricity comes and goes or the network signal is bad, my work continues!”

    Sundi Mpandachalo, Clinical Officer and health facility in-charge, Mwime Dispensary, Shinyanga city (pictured, centre)


    PARTNER: GSK and HDIF

    Our Results

    • 100 healthcare workers from 50 facilities trained on using the mVacciNation platform
    • 31,344 children registered
    • 208,791 immunisations per antigen
    • 11,691 stock updates captured
    • 14,390 temperature updates submitted
  • SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS
    (SRHR)

  • TANZANIA:

    improving access to sexual and reproductive health services for young people

    add

    #RightToHealth: Government-run health facilities in Tanzania are often poorly resourced, leaving young people with limited access to SRHR information and services. This in turn prevents them from making informed decisions about their sexual and reproductive health, putting them at risk of unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions, pregnancy-related complications, STIs, and HIV and AIDS.

    VacciNation is an innovative smartphone application that aims to reduce the number of missed vaccination appointments, ensuring that children in Geita and Shinyanga Regions complete their immunisation schedules. It allows frontline health workers to record data for every child they vaccinate, monitor vaccine temperatures, and keep track of stock levels. This data synchronises with the cloud, triggering mVacciNation’s unique feature: it sends SMS reminders to parents or caregivers three days in advance of their next vaccination appointment, giving them time to plan for the visit. It also alerts District Immunisation Officers when technical intervention is needed.

    Benson Nyato, a geography teacher at a secondary school in Handeni, is one of four faculty members trained through the programme.

    “In 2016, students used to drop out of school because of early marriage, but peer education activities have changed this, and in fact we are now enrolling a higher number of girls. Our school has become renowned for the SRHR knowledge and skills we give our students. I have seen the level of confidence of the peer educators increase tremendously.”

    19-year-old Charles Mbukwimba Daud (pictured) is one of them. “I always tell people, ‘It’s important for you to avail yourself of the support and services that are available’, especially because they’re free of charge,” he says. “It can prevent problems like early pregnancy. Being a peer educator can help young people become strong like me: I can speak in public now!”


    PARTNER: Allen & Overy, Big Lottery Fund, the Government of the Faroe Islands, Wolfson College (University of Oxford)

    Our Results

    • 4,496 women of reproductive age made use of MNCH services and were visited at home by Community Health Workers (CHWs)
    • 1,105 people living with HIV trained to support their peers
    • 9,857 people living with HIV supported through psychosocial support groups
    • 333 female CHWs supported
    • 241 nurses and midwives trained
    • 32 Mentor Mothers and Male Mentors supported
  • HEALTH WORKER TRAINING

  • KENYA:

    fighting non-communicable diseases

    add

    #RightToHealth: Worldwide, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) like asthma, diabetes, heart disease and cancer are responsible for 40 million deaths every year, three quarters of which occur in low- and middle-income countries. NCDs are aggravated by an unhealthy diet, a lack of physical activity, tobacco use and alcohol consumption: in fact, the WHO estimates that almost a quarter of NCD-related deaths could be prevented through healthier lifestyles and environments.

    Amref has partnered with GSK to combat NCDs in Kenya, focusing on childhood asthma and diabetes in four counties where these potentially debilitating conditions are most prevalent. Through a combination of face-to-face training and online and mobile learning, we are building the capacity of local health systems to prevent, diagnose, treat and manage NCDs. Community Health Workers (CHWs) are trained to recognise the signs and symptoms of asthma and diabetes. They can then refer people to the nearest health facility for diagnosis and treatment. Following diagnosis, they can help community members manage their conditions by taking their medication, going for regular check-ups, attending support group meetings, and making changes to their diet, lifestyle and environment.

    “To be honest, I never believed that it was possible to live a healthy life after being diagnosed with diabetes.”

    Market trader Rose Mwikali from Kilifi County (pictured)


    A year or so ago, Rose’s condition was so severe that she could barely leave her house. Because she couldn’t work, she was unable to pay her children’s school fees. With the help of her neighbour, Samuel – a CHW trained through mobile learning platform Leap – Rose is now managing her condition. “I’m back at work, selling mangoes at the market, and my children are all in school. I’m healthy, I rarely get sick, and I can provide for my family.”


    PARTNER: GSK

    Our Results

    • 1,102 CHWs trained to recognise the signs and symptoms of asthma and diabetes
    • More than 40,000 people screened for asthma and diabetes (since the project began)
    • More than 3 million people supported by CHWs
    • 204 nurses, 111 clinical officers, 48 lab technicians and 35 pharma technicians trained
  • WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE
    (WASH)

  • ETHIOPIA:

    tackling trachoma in South Omo

    add

    #RightToHealth: Making Universal Health Coverage a reality also means creating the conditions in which good health can thrive. That’s why Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) is one of the strategic pillars of our work.

    Trachoma is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the world. It spreads when living conditions are crowded, and when clean water and adequate sanitation facilities are scarce. Between 2014 and 2017, Amref and Orbis teamed up to tackle trachoma in South Omo, a vast and semi-arid region in southern Ethiopia, implementing an integrated programme of prevention, surgery and treatment. While Orbis delivered surgery and antibiotics, Amref sought to reduce infection rates by building and refurbishing safe water and sanitation facilities. To ensure their sustainability, we established and trained 14 community WASH committees tasked with the management and maintenance of the infrastructure. In parallel, with a view to encouraging lasting behaviour change, we implemented a comprehensive programme of community hygiene promotion. This included the establishment of WASH Clubs in 24 primary schools.

    “Partnering with more donors and working closely with regional governments, Amref Health Africa’s WASH programme in Ethiopia is widening its reach,”

    Programme Manager Kulule Mekonnen

    “This year, through our seven WASH projects, we’ve provided safe and sustainable water supply as well as sanitation and hygiene services in hard-to-reach rural areas, pastoral localities, and urban slums. We customise our projects to fit with community needs, local and national priorities. The trachoma project we implement in South Omo is a case in point.”


    PARTNER: Euromoney Institutional Investor PLC, The Headley Trust, The Bryan Guinness Charitable Trust, Government of the Faroes Islands, The Peter Stebbings Memorial Charity, and The Evan Cornish Foundation

    Our Results

    • 2,353 people receive sight-restoring surgery
    • Levels of infectious trachoma in children (aged one to nine) reduced from 25% to under 5%
    • Access to basic sanitation across South Omo increased from 8% to 83%
    • Access to safe water increased from 12% to 75%
    • 17,191 community members reached through water construction schemes

2017: A YEAR IN FUNDRAISING

Our total income for the year was




£23,863

2017 saw Amref take part in the Big Give Christmas Challenge, the UK’s biggest online match funding campaign, for the first time. Our supporters rallied round, enabling us to surpass our ambitious target, and raising a total of £23,863. Look out for the challenge again in 2018.

£2,587

Superstar supporters Emma Barton and Marion Preston took on Mount Kilimanjaro and raised £2,587 in support of our work. Emma and Marion both work for AstraZeneca, with whom Amref has partnered to tackle hypertension in Kenya through the ‘Healthy Heart' programme.

£2.2m

As we gear up to celebrate 30 years of our partnership with GSK in 2018, this truly strategic relationship continues to grow and evolve. This year, GSK contributed a remarkable £2.2 million to our work, strengthening health systems and changing lives in some of the world’s least developed countries.

From 2014-17, we partnered with sight-saving charity Orbis to tackle trachoma, the world’s leading cause of preventable blindness, in two rural districts in Ethiopia. In three years, we improved access to safe water and sanitation, and promoted important hygiene practices for preventing water-related diseases - bringing the prevalence of trachoma in children down to under 5%.

Euromoney Institutional Investor PLC brought their total contribution to £395,340 to the total project budget of £632,717.

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

Of every £1 spent...

90p
goes on
charitable activities*

10p
goes on fundraising

*including governance

For every £1 spent on fundraising

we raise £11.85

These financial highlights are taken from our Annual Accounts 2016-17, which can be found in full at www.amrefuk.org.

Total income generated for the year:

£4,424,240

Corporates: 2,422,071
Institutional Donors: 1,419,898
Individuals: 481,458
Trusts and Foundations: 64,000
Other* : 36,813

*Gifts in kind, Christmas cards, investments.

Last year, we sent

£2,789,917*

to projects in sub-Saharan Africa

*£3.1 million restricted funds were held in the UK at year end on behalf of donors awaiting distribution to Amref HQ in line with agreed milestones.

SAFEGUARDING AT AMREF

Amref Health Africa fully supports the push for greater transparency and accountability across every aspect of our sector’s work. This includes our approach to ensuring the safety and wellbeing of our staff, the people who benefit from our programmes and the communities in which we work. Drawing on expertise and best practice lessons from across the charity sector, Amref Health Africa UK is undertaking a thorough review of our established policies, processes and training on safeguarding, sexual harassment, and the protection of children and vulnerable adults; and strengthening our existing reporting and whistle-blowing mechanisms. We are also working closely with colleagues across the Amref network of organisations globally, to support a detailed review of their policies, processes and training. We recognise that this as a responsibility which starts with our leadership and must be reinforced by an appropriate organisational culture. This approach is driving our work to strengthen our policies and systems.

The primary responsibility of the global development sector is our duty of care towards the individuals, families and communities with whom we work. They should be able to expect the highest standard of behaviour from us - and aid workers, both individuals and organisations, must be held accountable when these standards are not met.